FAQ’s

Gynecology FAQ's


Women age 35 and older should have mammograms every one or two years. However, the likelihood of developing breast cancer is higher if a close blood relative has been diagnosed with the disease, especially if they were diagnosed before the age of 40. Likewise, women who began having their periods before the age of 12 or who went through menopause after the age of 55 are at higher risk, as are women who had their first child after age 30 or who never had a child. If you believe you may be at a higher risk, ask our physician when you should start being examined.

You should not miss any pill of the packet First, read the instructions that came with your pill. Generally speaking, if you miss one pill with the advise of our Gynaecologist, take two pills the next day. If you miss two pills, take two pills on each of the next two days. It’s best to use a backup contraception method such as condoms for the remainder of the month.

Cervical cancer screening is used to find abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix that could lead to cancer. Screening includes the Pap test and, for some women, testing for a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV).

Obstetrics FAQ's


If you’ve tested positive with a home pregnancy test, give us a call. We will schedule an appointment for you.

During pregnancy you should avoid fish that contains Mercury (including swordfish, tile fish, mackerel and shark). Also avoid saccharine, alcohol, deli meats, unpasteurized cheeses, and meat, poultry and fish that have been under-cooked.

It is safe to exercise in moderation during pregnancy, unless your obstetrician advises against it. Some exercises can help with childbirth.

It is usually safe to travel by airplane up to 34 weeks into your pregnancy. If you need to travel after 34 weeks, check with our physician. To reduce your chances of getting a blood clot during a flight.

IVF FAQ's


Because the IVF process bypasses the fallopian tubes (it was originally developed for women with blocked or missing fallopian tubes), it is the procedure of choice for those with fallopian tube issues, as well as for such conditions as endometriosis, male factor infertility and unexplained infertility. A physician can review a patient’s history and help to guide them to the treatment and diagnostic procedures that are most appropriate for them.

While some research suggests a slightly higher incidence of birth defects in IVF-conceived children compared with the general population (4 – 5% vs. 3%), it is possible that this increase is due to factors other than IVF treatment itself.

It is important to recognize that the rate of birth defects in the general population is about 3% of all births for major malformations and 6% if minor defects are included. Recent studies have suggested that the rate of major birth defects in IVF-conceived children may be on the order of 4 to 5%. This slightly increased rate of defects has also been reported for children born after IUI and for naturally-conceived siblings of IVF children, thus it is possible that the risk factor is inherent in this particular patient population rather than in the technique used to achieve conception.

Research indicates that IVF-conceived children are on par with the general population in academic achievement as well as with regards to behavioral and psychological health. More studies are under way to further investigate this important issue.

Compared with the general population, women who have never conceived appear to have a slightly increased risk of ovarian cancer (about 1.6 times the rate). Because it is thought that many of these women have also used fertility medications, it has been hypothesized that a link might exist between fertility medications and this particular cancer. A number of studies have been conducted since 1992 when this concern was first raised. None have found an association between fertility medications and higher risk of ovarian or between IVF treatment itself and higher risk of ovarian cancer. Preliminary results from an ongoing National Institutes of Health study likewise suggest no association between fertility medications and ovarian, uterine or breast cancer.

It is possible that this association is due not to the use of fertility medication, but to the fact that this population of women has never undergone childbirth. Findings from the National Institutes of Health and others suggest that pregnancy or some component of the childbearing process may in fact protect directly against ovarian cancer.

Because anesthesia is used for egg retrieval, patients feel nothing during the procedure. Egg retrieval is a minor surgery, in which a vaginal ultrasound probe fitted with a long, thin needle is passed through the wall of the vagina and into each ovary. The needle punctures each egg follicle and gently removes the egg through a gentle suction. Anesthesia wears off quickly once egg retrieval is concluded. Patients may feel some minor cramping in the ovaries that can be treated with appropriate medications.

Pediatrics FAQ's


All children are different and grow at different paces. Some children mature in bursts, some at a steady pace. However, if you have questions about your child’s development, consult with our pediatrician.

After the first year, healthy children, without ongoing conditions or other issues, can typically graduate to once or twice a year. However, this is only a basic rule. Questions or concerns about your child’s health? Talk with our pediatrician.

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is a cause of major concern for parents and medical professionals alike. Take precautions with your baby; doing so can lower many of the risks.

The pain often starts in the middle of the tummy and moves down low on the right side. The tummy becomes sore to touch. This is often worse with coughing and walking around. A child with appendicitis often shows signs of being unwell such as fever, refusing food, vomiting or (sometimes) diarrhoea.